The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Classics (CLAS), Greek (GR), Greek and Latin (GL), Latin (LAT)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

CLAS 110: Greece Spring Break Trip

1.00 Credits

An 8-day trip to Greece during CUA's spring break, emphasizing ancient, medieval, and modern sites and museums both inside and outside of Athens.

CLAS 125: Archaeology of Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

3.00 Credits

The course examines aspects of everyday life in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds through the study of relevant artifacts, artwork, architecture, and ancient texts. Topics include the home, the life of women, children, and slaves, education, marriage, professions, health, athletics, theater, entertainment, dress, hygiene, bathing, drinking, dining, death, and burial. Ancient and modern sources and evidence will be evaluated for reliability and relevance. Parallels between Greek and Roman society and between the ancient and modern world will also be evaluated.

CLAS 190: Archaeology of the Classical World

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the techniques and methods of archaeology in the Mediterranean through an examination of major monuments, artifacts, and sites from Prehistory to the 4th century AD. Architecture, sculpture, wall painting, vase painting, and other art forms will be considered from Rome, Athens, Egypt, Pompeii, Crete, Mycenae and elsewhere. We will also consider the relationship of archaeology to other disciplines such as history, classical languages, and art history.

CLAS 205: History of Ancient Greece

3.00 Credits

A chronological survey of the political and social history of Greece from "Agamemnon to Alexander to Augustus." Covers the period from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era, beginning with the Mycenaean kingdoms and concluding with the conquest of Cleopatra, the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt, by the future Roman emperor Augustus (31 BC). Focusing in particular upon the construction of Greek identity as shaped by such factors as geography, warfare, economy, and intercultural contact, the course will employ a textbook, primary sources read in English, and maps and other images to explore important issues in the evolution of Greek society. Subjects treated will include the rise of the Greek polis (city-state), the Greek colonization of the eastern and western Mediterranean, the development of diverse governmental and constitutional structures ranging from tyranny to democracy to monarchy, the blossoming of Greek artistic and intellectual life during the classical period and the conflicts between Greeks and Persians and between Athens and Sparta, the expedition of Alexander the Great, and the relationships of the Hellenistic kingdoms with Rome.

CLAS 206: History of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

Surveys the history of Rome and its empire from the foundation of the city in the eighth century BC to its breakup into successor states in the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries AD. Focuses on economic, social, and political themes, with special attention to geography, archaeology, and cultural exchange. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on critical interpretation.

CLAS 206R: History of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

The basic foundation of this course will be a chronological survey of the political and social history of Rome, beginning with myths and stories that describe the Roman people before the traditional establishment of the Republic in the late sixth century BC and concluding with the reign of the emperor Constantine (d. AD 337). Focusing in particular upon the city of Rome itself, the course will employ a textbook, primary sources read in English, and visits to selected archaeological sites to explore important issues in the evolution of the Roman state and Roman society, including but not limited to the processes and consequences of Roman expansion, the impact of powerful individual leaders upon the political and physical landscape of the capital, the development of civic and provincial administration, and the 'meaning' of the office of the Roman emperor. Course assessments will include reports on individual sites and historical events, as well as short-response assignments, a midterm exam, and a final paper. This course is taught at the Rome Campus.

CLAS 211: Greek and Roman Mythology

3.00 Credits

The myths of the Greeks and Romans convey ideas about the divine and the human and the interaction of the two. Investigates creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and such major myth cycles as the Trojan War within their historical and ritual contexts and in terms of their literary and artistic formulations and expressions.

CLAS 214: Mythology in Ancient Art

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 215: Ancient Heroic Poetry

3.00 Credits

A comparative and cross-cultural study of ancient heroic poetry (epic), focusing on Homer's Iliad (Greece) and Vergil's Aeneid (Rome), in the light of other heroic traditions from Africa (Sundiata), northern Europe (Beowulf), and the Near East (Gilgamesh). Special emphasis on the development of the hero-type as normative for human culture and values. All texts will be read in English translation; no prior knowledge of classics required.

CLAS 216: Odysseys in Greek and Roman Literature: Wandering, Adventure, and Getting Home

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 219: Democracy and Politics in Classical Athens

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 220: Alexander 'the Great': From Myth to Man

3.00 Credits

This course will follow Alexander on his eastern expedition from Greece to India and back again, tracing his adventures from his boyhood (supposedly) under the tutelage of Aristotle to his death in Babylon. Focusing upon historical and archaeological resources for the study of Alexander and his world--texts, inscriptions, buildings and monuments, statuary, and coinage--it will examine the joint influences of the heroic tradition and of ancient Greek political culture upon the Alexander story. It will also explore the extent to which Alexander's own performative and commemorative choices may have affected his rapid transition 'from man to myth.'

CLAS 224: Etymology

3.00 Credits

This course will help students appreciate the immense influence that Greek and Latin have exerted upon English. Students will be introduced to print and electronic tools that will enable them not only to appreciate the ways in which the English language has grown and continues to grow, but also to improve dramatically their vocabularies and their ability to see the roots--the hidden metaphors--of ordinary and obscure words.

CLAS 225: Ancient Warfare and Martial Arts

3.00 Credits

This course explores the practical and social aspects of warfare and martial arts in the Greco-Roman world. How did soldiers train and fight? How did generals learn and employ tactics? How did engineers build machines and fortifications? How did women and civilians suffer under (and sometimes participate in) armed struggles? These questions will be answered through ancient sources and relevant secondary literature and students will have the chance to see and handle replicas of common weapons of the time to gain a fuller sense of warfare in the ancient world.

CLAS 226: From Olympians to Gladiators: Sport and Contest in the Ancient World

3.00 Credits

This course will explore various athletic activities of the ancient Greeks and Romans from Homer to late antiquity and consider the questions "What were they like? What were they for?' Through ancient sources in translation, students will evaluate the role played by sports in maintaining health, serving the state, and, of course, honoring gods and entertaining crowds through contests. In addition to sampling ancient events, festivals, and personalities, students will also debate issues as contentious today as they were in antiquity: the place of athletics in education, the status of athletes in society, and the impact of professionalization.

CLAS 251: Ancient World in Cinema

3.00 Credits

The first -- and sole lengthy -- lecture of this course seeks to provide students with a brief but effective summary of the history of cinema to date in order to prepare them to appreciate more intelligently the "ancient world in cinema." The usual considerations of the evolution of an art form only recently fully recognized as such treat not only of key figures such as Edison, Griffith, Hitchcock, et al. and national movements such as German Expressionism, Soviet Socialist Realism, la Nouvelle Vague, etc. but also of the neglected, more ancient roots of cinema in Greek religious festivals, theater, magic shows, and the tableaux vivants (highly popular in the century or so before the essential technological components of cinema per se had been invented, matured, and brought together). The remainder of the course will focus on the serious, extensive viewing of a variety of films whose engagement with antiquity, preponderantly Western and Christian, may be either explicit and obvious (Alexander [2004], Gladiator [2000], Spartacus [1960], Ben-Hur [1959]) or indirect and subtle (The Adjustment Bureau [2011], Avatar [2009], Vertigo [1958], Orfée [1950]). Examples -- both Western classical and Biblical -- of the genre of the so-called disaster film will also be compared and contrasted in the closing weeks of the course. Films chosen for viewing and discussion vary somewhat from year to year, and come from a variety of eras, genres, and national backgrounds.

CLAS 281: Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire

3.00 Credits

Surveys the religious practices, structures, and beliefs of the culturally diverse populations under Roman imperial rule from the first to the fourth centuries AD. Particular focus on traditional (pagan) religion and early Christianity, with parallel treatment of Second Temple/rabbinic Judaism, Manichaeism, and other universal systems. Emphasis on lived religious experience, literature, ritual, and material representations of divine/human relations. Class time will be devoted to lectures (some illustrated), student presentations, and discussion of the primary sources.

CLAS 300: Greek Tragedy and Opera

3.00 Credits

A historical survey to explore the integral connection between the two genres. Selected number of tragedies will be studied and compared with the libretti of operas based on them. The course will cover fundamentals of performance practice of both genres, examine similarities and differences, and consider the degree to which opera adapts tragedy to its own needs or adapts itself to tragedy. Weekly listening and reading assignments (both primary and secondary literature). One presentation and one term paper required.

CLAS 301R: Roman History and Opera

3.00 Credits

A team-taught historical survey designed to explore the reception of ancient Roman culture into Western opera. Selected episodes from Roman mythology and history will be studied and compared with operatic libretti based upon them. The course will also cover fundamentals of operatic form and performance practice, and consider the degree to which opera adapts Roman tradition to its own needs and priorities. Weekly listening and reading assignments in both primary and secondary literature, with a significant online resource component. Assessments: listening quizzes, short-response assignments, one major presentation, one term paper, midterm and final exams. This course is taught at the Rome Campus.

CLAS 302: Greek and Roman Religion

3.00 Credits

A survey of Greek and Roman religious beliefs, customs, practices, and institutions from the Bronze Age to the conversion of Constantine. Students consider a wide variety of primary sources as well as selected secondary works on the sociology and anthropology of religion. Special attention to the Hellenistic and Roman background of Christianity.

CLAS 304R: Constantine and the Conversion of Empire

3.00 Credits

The conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity brought about by Constantine the Great and his fourth-century successors was a revolution whose effects continue to inform the very nature of Western civilization. An extraordinary abundance of contemporary sources, composed both by Constantine himself and by his admirers and partisans, make it possible to reconstruct his reign with a high level of detail, and to discover how the figure of the emperor was continually being depicted in new ways according to the varied goals of the texts that mention him. This seminar will invite students to reconsider what people today think that they know about Constantine in order to appreciate better both the emperor's conversion to Christianity and the impact that Constantine himself had upon Christian beliefs and forms of worship. Readings from the primary sources will be complemented by site visits around the city of Rome that will help bring Constantine's world to life.

CLAS 305: The Roman Family

3.00 Credits

Examines the history of the family in ancient Rome and the Roman empire. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on critical interpretation and discussion.

CLAS 306: Death, Art and the Afterlife

3.00 Credits

This course will explore Greek and Roman conceptions of death and afterlife, and their expression in funerary art and architecture from the early Archaic period through Late Antiquity. The course will examine rituals such as cremation, inhumation, funerary processions and other mourning and commemorative practices, as well as various types of burial markers and monuments, including stelai, urns, ossuaries, sarcophagi, catacomb paintings, and chamber tombs. Decorative imagery, inscriptions, and tomb structures will be studied from various perspectives as indicators of social status and cultural identity, gender and family structure, and beliefs about the afterlife. The dynamic effects of cross-cultural influence in Hellenistic Asia Minor and Roman Egypt will be investigated, as will the enduring impact of these ancient cosmologies and art forms on later cults and cultures, including Christianity in the later Roman period.

CLAS 307R: The Birth and Death of an Empire: Soldiers, Land, and Population Transferrals in Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 309: Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece

3.00 Credits

The Greek Bronze Age, from ca. 3000-1000 BC, is dominated by three highly developed cultures: the Cycladic culture on the Cycladic Islands around Delos, the Minoan culture on Crete, and the Mycenaean culture on the Greek mainland. This class explores the history of each culture, its art and architecture, as well as its significance for later periods of Greek history. The course will also highlight their interactions with each other and their relations with other contemporary cultures, such as Egypt.

CLAS 312: Greek Literature in Translation

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of important works of Greek poetry and prose in their historical setting, with an examination of their influence on the Western literary tradition.

CLAS 313: Roman Literature in Translation

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of important works of Roman poetry and prose in their historical setting, with an examination of their influence on the Western literary tradition.

CLAS 314R: Vergil's Aeneid and Its World

3.00 Credits

Vergil's Aeneid has enjoyed almost continuous high esteem from the time of its composition. It has shaped epic poetry, generated opera, and inspired visual art; it has played a role in nearly every assessment of literary greatness since the Renaissance (and even before); and it has invited generations of readers to rediscover some element of themselves in its vivid depictions of characters and emotions. And yet, how well do we really know the Aeneid of Vergil's own day? While few authors would deny aspiring to the kind of fame that Vergil ultimately achieved in the Western literary tradition, the Aeneid's original project was both much more culturally specific and uniquely ambitious. The epic sought to create a stirring foundation-myth for a society that lacked a strong story about itself; to link that myth to the complicated Roman inheritance of Greek culture; and to use that myth to engage with political life under Augustus, who was rapidly becoming the most powerful leader the Mediterranean world had ever known. This course will employ a close reading of the Aeneid (in English translation), along with selections from other works of both Greek and Roman literature (including Greek epic, lyric, and tragedy, and Latin elegy, lyric, and historiography), to examine the ways in which Vergil pursued these complicated goals by receiving and transforming the literary art generated by both his predecessors and his contemporaries, and by maintaining an acute awareness of Roman political and social identity. Weekly readings, lectures, and discussions; student close-reading presentations, brief objective quizzes, and two-page 'short-response' papers; essay-based final exam.

CLAS 317: Greek Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art, architecture, and archeology of Greece from its Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents through the late Hellenistic era. Readings and slide lectures/discussions emphasize the relationship of the arts to their broader cultural context and introduce a variety of art-historical methods. Major themes include the political and historical functions of art, self-definition and the Other, and the role of style in the construction of meaning.

CLAS 318: Roman Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art of the Roman Empire from its Etruscan origins until the age of Constantine. Examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts in Rome and its provinces in the context of political and cultural developments. Special emphasis on Roman identities----individual, gendered, social, civic, and cultural---and their effects on and reflections in art.

CLAS 318R: Art and Architecture of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the art and archaeology of the Roman Empire with a particular focus on the city of Rome. It examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, wall painting, and the decorative arts in Rome in the context of political and cultural developments. Special emphasis on Roman identities - individual, gendered, social, civic, and cultural - and their effects on and reflections in art. This course is taught at the Rome Campus.

CLAS 319: Introduction to Early Christian Art and Archaeology

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 321: Numismatic Workshop

3.00 Credits

In this class, students will work on Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and other ancient coins in the University's numismatic collections. On average, about 1 hour per week will be spent in formal instruction and about 2 hours per week in hands-on research. Tasks will include the physical description and measurement of coins, consultation of reference tools, both paper and on-line, entry of data into an electronic database, and research into the historical context of selected coins. Final reports will consist of the full description of a defined group of coins, with accompanying electronic data, and an oral and written summary of the work accomplished. Projects will be assigned on the basis of student knowledge and interest. To obtain departmental consent, students must be taking or have taken one of the following courses: CLAS 205/HIST 305, CLAS 206/HIST 314, LAT 101, GR 101, LAT 509, GR 509, CLAS 318, or the equivalent.

CLAS 325: Archeology of Ancient Life

3.00 Credits

Examines aspects of everyday life in ancient Greece and Rome by combining information from ancient texts in translation, representations, and archeological remains. Considers such topics as dress and personal adornment, the home, women's life, children, education and literacy, slavery, military service, athletics and recreation, medicine, life expectancy, and funerary practices.

CLAS 326: Greek and Roman Houses

3.00 Credits

The course examines the nature of domestic space in Greek and Roman contexts, including private homes, villas, and apartments. We will examine residences from ancient Greek and Roman contexts to explore questions about society and culture. Topics of discussion include: slaves, dining, gender, apartment living, rural life, decorative arts, and ancient gardens. Special emphasis is on the sites of Olynthos, Pompeii, and Ostia.

CLAS 327: The Archaeology of Ancient Performance: Images, Spaces, Practices

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 340: Science in Ancient Greece and Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 350: Ancient Romans on the Good Life

3.00 Credits

What does it mean to live our lives well? This is a question that Romans of the classical world considered fundamental for everyone, regardless of status or prospects in life. A body of literature - essays, dialogues, letters, comedy of manners and satire - arose to address this issue. Characteristically, Romans focused on human experience as authoritative and taught through examples of both good and bad behavior what attitudes and actions conduce to a successful and satisfying life. This course will read and consider major works by Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Horace and Seneca around the theme of the good life.

CLAS 425: Senior Tutorial

1.00 Credits

This one-credit course, taken in the first semester of senior year, will familiarize students with the resources available for research in Classics, Latin, and Classical Civilization. Students will develop the topic and bibliography of the senior research paper required for graduation.

CLAS 426: Senior Project

2.00 Credits

A two-credit course taken in the second semester of senior year to complete the required research project.

CLAS 431: The Teaching of the Classics

3.00 Credits

Designed to acquaint prospective teachers with methods of teaching Latin; with materials for the instruction of mythology, Roman culture, and etymology; with textbooks, audiovisual materials, and computer programs. All aspects of teaching are considered, including comprehension of texts, organization of the class period, homework, grading, discipline, motivation, worksheets, quizzes, examinations and standardized tests, projects, field trips, contests, national trends, scholarship opportunities for teachers and students, and participation in humanities programs at the secondary level.

CLAS 446: Augustan Rome

3.00 Credits

Investigates the city of Rome and the beginnings of the Roman empire as constituted by Augustus in the late first century B.C. to early first century A.D. Works produced by the circle of intellectuals and practitioners around Augustus (Virgil, Horace, Vitruvius, and others) provided models for later Western literature and art. Uses primary sources---archeological, artistic, and literary--- to investigate the political, social, and moral climate and the appearance of Augustan Rome.

CLAS 472: Mediterranean World of Late Antiquity

3.00 Credits

Surveys the process by which the ancient world was transformed into the medieval world; covers roughly the period between the third and eighth centuries A.D. During this critical period, Christianity was successfully established throughout the Mediterranean world, Germanic invaders overthrew the Roman empire in the West, and Islam came to dominate North Africa and the Middle East. Particular attention to various issues of continuity and discontinuity in religion, politics, and culture. Readings include both primary and secondary sources.

CLAS 492: Directed Reading - Undergraduate

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 493: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 493A: Directed Research

2.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 493B: Directed Research

1.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 495: Internship

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

CLAS 521: Numismatic Workshop

3.00 Credits

In this class, students will work on Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and other ancient coins in the University's numismatic collections. On average, about 1 hour per week will be spent in formal instruction and about 2 hours per week in hands-on research. Tasks will include the physical description and measurement of coins, consultation of reference tools, both paper and on-line, entry of data into an electronic database, and research into the historical context of selected coins. Final reports will consist of the full description of a defined group of coins, with accompanying electronic data, and an oral and written summary of the work accomplished. Projects will be assigned on the basis of student knowledge and interest. Graduate students in any program are eligible, but must have completed at least two years of Latin or two years of Greek at the college level.

CLAS 527: The Archaeology of Ancient Performance: Images, Spaces, Practices

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 531: The Teaching of the Classics

3.00 Credits

Designed to acquaint prospective teachers with methods of teaching Latin; with materials for the instruction of mythology, Roman culture, and etymology; with textbooks, audiovisual materials, and computer programs. All aspects of teaching are considered, including comprehension of texts, organization of the class period, homework, grading, discipline, motivation, worksheets, quizzes, examinations and standardized tests, projects, field trips, contests, national trends, scholarship opportunities for teachers and students, and participation in humanities programs at the secondary level.

CLAS 546: Augustan Rome

3.00 Credits

Investigates the city of Rome and the beginnings of the Roman empire as constituted by Augustus in the late first century B.C. to early first century A.D. Works produced by the circle of intellectuals and practitioners around Augustus (Virgil, Horace, Vitruvius, and others) provided models for later Western literature and art. Uses primary sources---archeological, artistic, and literary--- to investigate the political, social, and moral climate and the appearance of Augustan Rome.

CLAS 560: Greek Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 561: Roman Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 564: Topics in Ancient History/Culture

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 565: Topics in Ancient History and Culture

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 566: Topics in Ancient History/Culture

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 572: Mediterranean World of Late Antiquity

3.00 Credits

Surveys the process by which the ancient world was transformed into the medieval world; covers roughly the period between the third and eighth centuries A.D. During this critical period, Christianity was successfully established throughout the Mediterranean world, Germanic invaders overthrew the Roman empire in the West, and Islam came to dominate North Africa and the Middle East. Particular attention to various issues of continuity and discontinuity in religion, politics, and culture. Readings include both primary and secondary sources.

CLAS 589: Teaching Classical Mythology

1.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 591: Byzantium & the West: Cultural and Artistic Exchange in Medieval Europe, C. 1000-1300

3.00 Credits

This course will examine Eastern and Western cultural interaction in the High and Late Middle Ages. It will focus on the reception of Byzantine art in medieval Italy and transalpine Europe, and will include the Christian encounter with Islamic art and precious objects. It will examine these cross-cultural exchanges and the methodological approaches that scholars have developed in tracing the reception of Byzantine and Islamic imagery and objects. Among the themes that will be addressed: the circulation and afterlife of objects, the reception mechanisms of influence, appropriation, assimilation, and hybridity, Christian devotion in Byzantium and the West, social processes such as gift-giving, diplomacy, and the establishment of political ideologies.

CLAS 592: Directed Reading - Masters

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 595: Graduate Internship

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 595A: Graduate Internship

1.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 610: The Material World of Early Christianity

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 615: Masterpieces of Classical Literature.

3.00 Credits

Deals with important works of Greek and Latin poetry and prose in their historical setting. The works not only represent major genres but themselves often set in motion generic assumptions and conventions influential in later Western literature. Students will compare and contrast the treatment of similar subjects and themes in works of different historical periods and literary traditions, and complete a major research paper.

CLAS 621: Gibbon's Decline and Fall

3.00 Credits

Studies Gibbon's great six-volume history (1776-88), still the most influential account in English of the "fall" of the Roman Empire.

CLAS 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

CLAS 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

CLAS 705: Seminar

3.00 Credits

We shall engage in very close reading of a selection of Augustine's letters, allowing students to study both style and strategy. We shall also explore the relation between letters to other bishops and what else we know about Augustine's relationship with the sees concerned. We shall give some attention to the famous exchanges with Jerome and Paulinus of Nola, but we shall focus most on an historical issue: the episcopal letter as an instrument ' indeed, one of the hallmarks ' of episcopacy itself, as well as of alliance among the Christian leaders of North Africa. Knowledge of Latin will be essential to some approaches, but students from outside the Greek and Latin and the Early Christian Studies programs are warmly invited to enroll, since there will be much that can be achieved through available translations, and grades will not be affected. Theology students studying Latin Patristics should feel particularly encouraged. A fuller description of the course will be available in the summer, and a full syllabus closer to the semester. Note that, in addition to a seminar presentation, a research essay will also be a required assignment. For advance reading, make yourselves fully familiar with Peter Brown's biography (the 2000 edition), and read Confessions Books 1-9 and Possidius' Life.

CLAS 706: Seminar

3.00 Credits

no description available

CLAS 709: The Pagan Holy Man

3.00 Credits

The course will identify men playing such a role within traditional religious culture in the high empire, assess their formation and purpose, and examine the literary heritage attached to figures like Pythagoras, Apollonius of Tyana, and other prominent "philosophers," studying in the process certain aspects of the Second Sophistic and assessing its influence on Christian notions of philosophic virtue and praxis.

CLAS 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

CLAS 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

GL 701: Introduction to Classical Studies

1.00 Credits

An orientation in the main areas of classical scholarship: literature, history, archeology, epigraphy, paleography, art history, etc.

GL 705: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of texts in Greek and Latin on various topics, with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

GL 706: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of texts in Greek and Latin on various topics, with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

GL 707: The Later Roman Empire

3.00 Credits

Research seminar on the patristic age. Attention to a selected period, region, or historical problem, with a view to introducing students to the relevant sources for the topic as well as the opportunity to work seriously on a particular problem.

GL 755: Greek and Latin Epigraphy

3.00 Credits

A survey of important inscriptions from the late antique period.

GL 803: Comparative Greek & Latin Philology

3.00 Credits

Lectures on phonology and morphology, with readings and analysis of texts.

GL 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

GL 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

GR 101: Elementary Greek I

4.00 Credits

First course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of Attic Greek; frequent exercises in reading and writing Greek.

GR 102: Elementary Greek II

4.00 Credits

Second course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of Attic Greek; frequent exercises in reading and writing Greek.

GR 103: Intermediate Greek I

3.00 Credits

Careful readings of Attic or Atticizing prose to build on the basics of syntax and grammar acquired in 101, 102. In conjunction with the goal of increasing mechanical competency (recognition of forms, etc.), some attention to the ways in which prose persuades, informs, educates, and entertains through the careful choice and arrangement of words and thoughts.

GR 103R: Intermediate Greek I

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 104: Intermediate Greek II

3.00 Credits

Careful readings of Homeric poetry to build on the basics of syntax and grammar acquired in 101, 102. In conjunction with the goal of increasing mechanical competency (recognition of forms, etc.), some attention to the ways in which poetry persuades, informs, educates, and entertains through the careful choice and arrangement of words and thoughts.

GR 120: Elementary Modern Greek I

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 201: Readings in New Testament Greek

3.00 Credits

Intermediate-level readings in the Greek New Testament and other koine texts with an emphasis upon the mastery of grammar and syntax. Careful attention to the differences between Attic and koine Greek, and to the unique linguistic and cultural contexts that gave rise to the koine. Prerequisite: One year of college-level Greek (either Attic or Biblical/koine) or the equivalent. May be taken concurrently with GR 103, GR 104, or other classical Greek course at the intermediate level.

GR 335: Socrates

3.00 Credits

Considers, in the original and in translation, the major sources for our knowledge of the character, beliefs, and career of this important figure. An attempt to understand both the impressions he made on his contemporaries and his significance in the Greek philosophical tradition. Primary texts include Aristophanes' Clouds, Plato's Apology, and Xenophon's Memorabilia.

GR 340: Herodotus

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 409: Intensive Elementary Greek

6.00 Credits

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Greek language, designed for those who wish to accelerate study of the language.

GR 411: Greek Prose Composition

3.00 Credits

An accelerated review of Greek grammar and syntax, and an introduction to the composition of Greek prose.

GR 412: Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

3.00 Credits

Advanced grammar and syntax with extensive practice in the composition of Attic Greek.

GR 415: Greek Historiography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the Greek historians, including Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

GR 416: Intensive Intermediate Greek I

3.00 Credits

A sequel to GR 509. Provides experience in reading classical Greek prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Equivalent to GR 103. Summer session only.

GR 417: Intensive Intermediate Greek II

3.00 Credits

A sequel to GR 516. Provides further experience in reading classical Greek prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: GR 516 or the departmental placement exam in Greek. Equivalent to GR 104. Summer session only.

GR 418: Greek Tragedy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the works of Euripides, Sophocles, or Aeschylus, or of a selection of plays by diverse tragedians. Students read at least two complete tragedies in Greek. Secondary readings help delineate the historical, civic, and festival milieu and the physical circumstances of performance.

GR 423: Homer

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from Homer, principally the Iliad. Topics to be discussed in conjunction with the study of the text will include some or all of the following: the nature of oral composition (metrical and aesthetic aspects), the relationship of the Homeric poems to the wide-ranging (and largely lost) epic cycle, the scholiastic tradition, the emergence of the Christian Homeric cento in Late Antiquity. Requirement: two levels of college Greek.

GR 424: Homeric Hymns

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 428: Greek Lyric

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the fragmentary remains of the Aeolic (e.g., Sappho and Alcaeus) and Ionic (e.g., Archilocus, Mimnermus, Solon, Simonides, Anacreon) traditions of personal lyric. Comparative material may be drawn from Doric choral lyric or Hellenistic authors.

GR 429: Greek Choral Lyric

3.00 Credits

Examines the body of lyric composed for group, rather than solo, performance, with an emphasis on the epinician odes composed by Pindar and Bacchylides for victors in the pan-Hellenic games. The syllabus may also include dithyrambs and paeans sung in liturgical settings and odes performed between the scenes of tragic and comic dramas.

GR 432: Greek Comedy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected plays of Aristophanes and Old Attic comedy and/or of Menander and the New Comedy of the Hellenistic era. Secondary readings help delineate the historical, civic, and festival milieu and the physical circumstances of performance.

GR 434: Greek Historical Writing

3.00 Credits

Examines themes and key concepts in Greek historical writing from Herodotus (d. c. 425 BC) to Niketas Choniates (d. 1216). Explores the transformation and preservation of major themes, problems, and modes of expression from ancient into medieval Greek historiography. Authors include Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, Diodorus Siculus, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Plutarch, Eusebius, Procopius, Theophanes, Leo the Deacon, Michael Psellos, Nikephoros Bryennios, Anna Komnene, and Niketas Choniates. Topics include religion and the divine; fortuna/tyche and fate vs. free will; heroism; gender; rhetoric; and 'truthiness' and historical factuality.

GR 435: Greek Epic

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from Homer and the epic cycle.

GR 448: Greek Pastoral

3.00 Credits

The Idylls of Theocritus form the nucleus of this course, which may also include works of the various genres in which pastoral themes play a significant role.

GR 450: Stars, Fate, and the Soul

3.00 Credits

Focusing on the Platonic corpus but including also selected texts from the Pre-Socratics up through the Cappadocian Fathers, this course will explore the development of the debate on the twin beliefs in (1) the putative influence of the stars on fate and (2) the astral destiny of the soul.

GR 453: Greek Oratory

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected speeches by Demosthenes, Lysias, Gorgias, and other orators.

GR 465: Advanced Greek Seminar

3.00 Credits

Reading and study of selected texts in Greek and English against the background of a rapid survey of the history of Greek literature.

GR 476: Greek Philosophical Works

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the works of the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and other philosophers.

GR 481: The Greek Novel

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the romantic prose compositions of Achilles Statius, Chariton, Heliodorus, Longus, and Xenophon Ephesius.

GR 487: The Athenian Empire

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the "first" Athenian empire, from its origins after the Persian War to its downfall at the end of the Peloponnesian War. Students read and study primary sources in Greek and examine archeological, numismatic, and art historical evidence.

GR 490: Introduction to Byzantine Greek Language and Literature

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce advanced-level students of classical Greek to Byzantine literature. By studying different texts each week, students will become familiar with a millennium of Byzantine history, and with a society that was profoundly interested in the relationship between faith and reason on both political and theological levels. Participants will be introduced to the main features of medieval Greek, with a particular stress on its differences from classical Greek; read a selection of texts (hagiography / religious literature, poems and/or profane literature, historiography and philosophy) representative of the variety of medieval Greek literature and of the many possibilities it offers; and receive an orientation in some of the principal areas of medieval Greek scholarship, including lexica, bibliographies, and leading collections and repertories of sources.

GR 492: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 492R: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 501: Elementary Greek for Graduate Students I

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 502: Elementary Greek for Graduate Students II

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 504: Readings in New Testament Greek

3.00 Credits

Intermediate-level readings in the Greek New Testament and other koine texts with an emphasis upon the mastery of grammar and syntax. Careful attention to the differences between Attic and koine Greek, and to the unique linguistic and cultural contexts that gave rise to the koine. Prerequisite: One year of college-level Greek (either Attic or Biblical/koine) or the equivalent (including TRS 502). May be taken concurrently with GR 103, GR 104, or other classical Greek course at the intermediate level. This course is the graduate equivalent of GR 201.

GR 505: Elementary Greek I

4.00 Credits

no description available

GR 506: Elementary Greek II

4.00 Credits

no description available

GR 507: Intermediate Greek I

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 508: Intermediate Greek II

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 509: Intensive Elementary Greek

6.00 Credits

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Greek language, designed for those who wish to accelerate study of the language.

GR 511: Greek Prose Composition

3.00 Credits

An accelerated review of Greek grammar and syntax, and an introduction to the composition of Greek prose.

GR 512: Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

3.00 Credits

Advanced grammar and syntax with extensive practice in the composition of Attic Greek.

GR 515: Greek Historiography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the Greek historians, including Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

GR 516: Intensive Intermediate Greek I

3.00 Credits

A sequel to GR 509. Provides experience in reading classical Greek prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Equivalent to GR 103. Summer session only.

GR 517: Intensive Intermediate Greek II

3.00 Credits

A sequel to GR 516. Provides further experience in reading classical Greek prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: GR 516 or the departmental placement exam in Greek. Equivalent to GR 104. Summer session only.

GR 518: Greek Tragedy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the works of Euripides, Sophocles, or Aeschylus, or of a selection of plays by diverse tragedians. Students read at least two complete tragedies in Greek. Secondary readings help delineate the historical, civic, and festival milieu and the physical circumstances of performance.

GR 519: Intensive Intermediate Greek

6.00 Credits

An accelerated study of selected texts by Attic Greek authors designed to develop further the student's proficiency in reading Greek. The course builds upon the vocabulary and principles of grammar and syntax acquired in Elementary Greek (GR 101-102, GR 509).

GR 520: Elementary Modern Greek I

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 523: Homer

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from Homer, principally the Iliad. Topics to be discussed in conjunction with the study of the text will include some or all of the following: the nature of oral composition (metrical and aesthetic aspects), the relationship of the Homeric poems to the wide-ranging (and largely lost) epic cycle, the scholiastic tradition, the emergence of the Christian Homeric cento in Late Antiquity. Requirement: two levels of college Greek.

GR 524: Homeric Hymns

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 528: Greek Lyric

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the fragmentary remains of the Aeolic (e.g., Sappho and Alcaeus) and Ionic (e.g., Archilocus, Mimnermus, Solon, Simonides, Anacreon) traditions of personal lyric. Comparative material may be drawn from Doric choral lyric or Hellenistic authors.

GR 529: Greek Choral Lyric

3.00 Credits

Examines the body of lyric composed for group, rather than solo, performance, with an emphasis on the epinician odes composed by Pindar and Bacchylides for victors in the pan-Hellenic games. The syllabus may also include dithyrambs and paeans sung in liturgical settings and odes performed between the scenes of tragic and comic dramas.

GR 530: Aspects of Performance in Classical Greek Literature

3.00 Credits

A broad selection of Greek lyric and choral poetry (to include examples from the Attic stage) as well as sympotic, political and philosophical poetry and prose will be read closely in Greek. A consistent effort will be made, through the use of a broad spectrum of tools, drawn from philology, rhetoric, literary criticism, etc., to highlight the manner in which much of what is now referred to as Greek literature was originally produced for (competitive) performance.

GR 532: Greek Comedy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected plays of Aristophanes and Old Attic comedy and/or of Menander and the New Comedy of the Hellenistic era. Secondary readings help delineate the historical, civic, and festival milieu and the physical circumstances of performance.

GR 534: Greek Historical Writing

3.00 Credits

Examines themes and key concepts in Greek historical writing from Herodotus (d. c. 425 BC) to Niketas Choniates (d. 1216). Explores the transformation and preservation of major themes, problems, and modes of expression from ancient into medieval Greek historiography. Authors include Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, Diodorus Siculus, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Plutarch, Eusebius, Procopius, Theophanes, Leo the Deacon, Michael Psellos, Nikephoros Bryennios, Anna Komnene, and Niketas Choniates. Topics include religion and the divine; fortuna/tyche and fate vs. free will; heroism; gender; rhetoric; and 'truthiness' and historical factuality.

GR 535: Greek Epic

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from Homer and the epic cycle.

GR 536: Socrates

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 540: Herodotus

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 541: Introduction to Later Greek Language and Literature

3.00 Credits

An introduction to late antique Greek language and literature. The course focuses on close reading of selected texts from different genres, with three goals: to acquaint students with the vocabulary, syntax, style, and pronunciation of later Greek; to introduce late antique literature, including basic philological and reference aids and current trends in modern scholarship; and to investigate the characteristics of later Greek literature, including such themes as interaction between classical and Christian literature and culture, development of new genres, centrality of the written word and interpretation, etc.

GR 548: Greek Pastoral

3.00 Credits

The Idylls of Theocritus form the nucleus of this course, which may also include works of the various genres in which pastoral themes play a significant role.

GR 550: Stars, Fate, and the Soul

3.00 Credits

Focusing on the Platonic corpus but including also selected texts from the Pre-Socratics up through the Cappadocian Fathers, this course will explore the development of the debate on the twin beliefs in (1) the putative influence of the stars on fate and (2) the astral destiny of the soul.

GR 553: Greek Oratory

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected speeches by Demosthenes, Lysias, Gorgias, and other orators.

GR 576: Greek Philosophical Works

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the works of the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and other philosophers.

GR 581: The Greek Novel

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the romantic prose compositions of Achilles Statius, Chariton, Heliodorus, Longus, and Xenophon Ephesius.

GR 587: The Athenian Empire

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the "first" Athenian empire, from its origins after the Persian War to its downfall at the end of the Peloponnesian War. Students read and study primary sources in Greek and examine archeological, numismatic, and art historical evidence.

GR 590: Introduction to Byzantine Greek Language and Literature

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce advanced-level students of classical Greek to Byzantine literature. By studying different texts each week, students will become familiar with a millennium of Byzantine history, and with a society that was profoundly interested in the relationship between faith and reason on both political and theological levels. Participants will be introduced to the main features of medieval Greek, with a particular stress on its differences from classical Greek; read a selection of texts (hagiography / religious literature, poems and/or profane literature, historiography and philosophy) representative of the variety of medieval Greek literature and of the many possibilities it offers; and receive an orientation in some of the principal areas of medieval Greek scholarship, including lexica, bibliographies, and leading collections and repertories of sources.

GR 592: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 603: Readings in New Testament Greek

3.00 Credits

Intermediate-level readings in the Greek New Testament and other koine texts with an emphasis upon the mastery of grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: One year of college-level Greek.

GR 604: Advanced Biblical Greek

3.00 Credits

Philological study of New Testament texts chosen to suit needs of students, including textual criticism, analysis of linguistic patterns, and problems of translation and Semitic interference. Prerequisite: GR 603 or department permission.

GR 611: Greek Epigraphy

3.00 Credits

Surveys Greek inscriptions, both classical and early Christian.

GR 613: Introduction to Greek Papyrology

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 655: Survey of Greek Literature

3.00 Credits

A review of selected works of Hellenic and Hellenistic literature, from the emergence of the Homeric texts in the mid-eighth century B.C. to later Byzantine authors.

GR 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

GR 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

GR 705: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of one or more texts with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

GR 706: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of one or more texts with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

GR 792: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

GR 834: Textual Criticism

3.00 Credits

This course will offer a practical introduction to the editing of a Greek patristic text: constructing and applying a stemma codicum, evaluating variant readings, organizing an apparatus criticus, punctuating the text, and identifying scriptural quotations and allusions. The text to be edited will be Theodoret, Questions on Kings and Chronicles, 2 Kings = 2 Samuel.

GR 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

GR 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

GR 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

LAT 101: Elementary Latin I

4.00 Credits

First course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in forms, vocabulary, and syntax; frequent exercises in reading and writing Latin.

LAT 102: Elementary Latin II

4.00 Credits

Second course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in forms, vocabulary, and syntax; frequent exercises in reading and writing Latin.

LAT 102R: Elementary Latin II - Rome Campus

4.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 103: Intermediate Latin I

3.00 Credits

A continuation of LAT 102 or 509 that provides an introduction to Latin prose and poetry, with emphasis on the close reading, translation, study and discussion of representative texts and attention to their characteristic language, syntax, and style. The course also features continued review of the grammatical principles of Latin and expansion of vocabulary.

LAT 103R: Intermediate Latin I - Rome Campus

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 104: Intermediate Latin II

3.00 Credits

A continuation of LAT 103, with emphasis on the close reading, translation, study, and discussion of representative texts and attention to their characteristic language, syntax, and style. The course also features continued review of the grammatical principles of Latin and expansion of vocabulary.

LAT 104R: Intermediate Latin II - Rome Campus

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 314: Livy

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 407: Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the forms, grammar, and vocabulary of Ecclesiastical Latin. No prior knowledge of Latin required. (This course is not part of the Elementary/Intermediate Latin sequence and does not count toward the School of Arts and Sciences language requirement. Students planning to continue the study of Latin beyond the first year should take LAT 101, LAT 501, or LAT 509 instead.)

LAT 408: Readings in Ecclesiastical Latin

3.00 Credits

Completion of the forms, grammar, and vocabulary of Ecclesiastical Latin followed by readings in Ecclesiastical Latin. Pre-requisite: LAT 407/507 or TRS 500A. (This course is not part of the Elementary/Intermediate Latin sequence and does not count toward the School of Arts and Sciences language requirement. Students planning to continue the study of Latin beyond the first year should be enrolled in LAT 102, LAT 502, or LAT 509.)

LAT 409: Intensive Elementary Latin

6.00 Credits

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Latin language of the classical period, and experience in reading continuous Latin texts of limited complexity.

LAT 410: Readings in Postclassical Latin

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 509. Provides experience reading a variety of texts of postclassical Latin as the interests and needs of the students require.

LAT 411: Latin Prose Composition

3.00 Credits

An accelerated review of Latin grammar and syntax, and an introduction to the composition of Latin prose.

LAT 412: Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

3.00 Credits

Advanced grammar and syntax, with extensive practice in the composition of classical Latin prose.

LAT 415: Roman Historiography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from such Latin historians as Sallust, Caesar, Livy, Suetonius, and Tacitus.

LAT 416: Intensive Intermediate Latin I

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 509. Provides experience in reading classical Latin prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Equivalent to LAT 103. Summer session only.

LAT 417: Intensive Intermediate Latin II

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 516. Provides further experience in reading classical Latin prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: LAT 516 or the departmental placement exam in Latin. Equivalent to LAT 104. Summer session only.

LAT 420: Roman Drama

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected works of the Roman playwrights (Plautus, Terence, and/or Seneca), with attention to historical context, composition and language, and theatrical performance.

LAT 424: Julius Caesar

3.00 Credits

Studies the career and writings of C. Julius Caesar in the context of late republican politics and culture.

LAT 427: Down on the Farm: Cicero, Horace, and the Good Life in Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 428: Roman Lyric

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected poems of Catullus and/or Horace.

LAT 429: Roman Elegy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the poems of such Latin elegists as Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid.

LAT 430: Ovid

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of Ovid's poetry.

LAT 431: Horace

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the poetry of Horace.

LAT 432: Virgil's Aeneid

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 433: Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of these works, with attention to language, tropes, meter, and historical, literary, and social context.

LAT 435: Latin Epic

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of representative works, e.g., the Aeneid of Virgil or the Thebaid of Statius, with attention to language, tropes, meter, and historical, literary, and social context.

LAT 448: Roman Pastoral

3.00 Credits

Explores the ways in which Latin poets adapted a traditionally escapist genre to serve as a vehicle for reflection on contemporary social and political problems. Students read representative bucolics based ultimately on the Theocritean model, with attention also to issues of Roman political and social history (e.g., the collapse of the republican oligarchy, the changing conception of the ideal prince, and the Christianization of the aristocracy).

LAT 453: Roman Oratory

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected speeches of Cicero.

LAT 458: Roman Satire

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of representative works, with attention to one or more authors (Horace, Juvenal, Seneca, Persius) or to the development of this uniquely Roman literary genre from the polymetric satires of Lucilius (second century B.C.) to the prose diatribes of Jerome.

LAT 459: Lucretius

3.00 Credits

The principal focus of this course is a close reading of the Latin of Lucretius' powerful and perennially controversial poem. While consistent attention will be paid to the poetic craft and nascent Alexandrianism of the De rerum natura, the poet's adaptation and transformation of Epicureanism will be kept in mind as well through regular reference both to the surviving fragments of Epicurus himself and what we know of the activities of his "garden"/school. Thus, Epicurean theories of perception, cosmology, even theology -- distant, blissfully disinterested gods residing in the spaces between universes -- as well as the considerable Nachleben of this keen, philosophical rival of Christianity in the Roman Empire and beyond, into the modern era, will be considered and discussed.

LAT 461: Introduction to Medieval Latin Studies

3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to the Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (ca. A.D. 200-1500). Designed to improve students' facility in dealing with Medieval Latin texts of all kinds and to move them toward independent work with such texts. LATIN 561 will (1) introduce participants to those aspects of Latin identified as the constitutive elements of the Latin of the Middle Ages (i.e., the Classical, popular, vernacular, and Christian elements); (2) emphasize the close reading and careful translation of a selection of representative texts and documents, with attention to vocabulary and word formation, orthography and pronunciation, morphology and syntax, and prose styles and metrics; (3) provide an orientation in some of the principal areas of Medieval Latin scholarship, including lexica, bibliographies, great collections and repertories of sources, and reference works for the study of Latin works composed in the Middle Ages. Prerequisite: completion of four semesters of college Latin through LAT 104 or LAT 519 or the equivalent.

LAT 462: Topics in Medieval Latin Studies

3.00 Credits

Building upon the experience acquired in LATIN 561, this course will explore one or more Medieval Latin texts or genres, consider aspects of the development of medieval Latinity, or examine the Latin used in various fields of academic specialization. Prerequisite: LAT 541 or LAT 542 or LAT 561.

LAT 465: Advanced Latin Seminar

3.00 Credits

Study of selected texts in Latin and English with attention to the development of genres and themes in Roman literature of the late Republic and early empire.

LAT 476: Roman Philosophical Works

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the philosophical works of such authors as Lucretius, Cicero, and Seneca.

LAT 477: Early Christian Biography

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 479: Roman Epistolography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected letters of such authors as Cicero, Horace, Pliny the Younger, Fronto, Symmachus, Ausonius, Jerome, and Augustine.

LAT 481: The Roman Novel

3.00 Credits

Considers a single work (e.g., Petronius' Satyricon, Apuleius' Golden Ass) or the development of fictional narrative in Latin prose and poetry.

LAT 485: Augustine's Confessions

3.00 Credits

A close reading of the text with full attention to its cultural, historical, and religious contexts.

LAT 487: The Roman Revolution

3.00 Credits

A survey of the events leading up to the fall of the Roman republic and an analysis of the "constitutional" revolution that followed. Students read a variety of sources in Latin and examine archaeological, numismatic, and art historical evidence.

LAT 488: The Age of Nero

3.00 Credits

Frequently portrayed as an age of luxury, decadence, and excess, Nero's reign from A.D. 54-68 can be vividly recreated by a close reading of Petronius, Suetonius, Tacitus, and other writers, as well as by the study of inscriptions, coins, and artwork. Focuses on the social history of Rome in the first century A.D.

LAT 489: The Christian Church in the Roman Empire

3.00 Credits

Examines the history of Christianity in the Roman empire from its origins in Roman Palestine in the first century to its establishment as the Roman state religion in the fourth century. Readings include selections from the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, Tacitus, Suetonius, Pliny the Younger, and Augustine. Topics include the persecution of Christians, their social status, the organization of the church, Christian conversion, and the conversion of Constantine.

LAT 492: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 492R: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 493: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

LAT 501: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of classical Latin. Continued by LAT 502 (Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II). This two-course sequence covers the same ground as LAT 509 (Intensive Elementary Latin), but over a full academic year rather than a single semester or summer session. Designed for graduate students in theology, philosophy, history, politics, music, medieval studies, English, and related disciplines.

LAT 501A: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students

3.00 Credits

Restricted to students in Canon Law.

LAT 501B: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I

3.00 Credits

Restricted to students in Canon Law. Course is taught online only.

LAT 502: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of classical Latin. Continues LAT 501. This two-course sequence (LAT 501 and 502) covers the same ground as LAT 509 (Intensive Elementary Latin), but over a full academic year rather than a single semester or summer session. Designed for graduate students in theology, philosophy, history, politics, music, medieval studies, English, and related disciplines. Readings drawn from classical and post-classical Latin authors.

LAT 502A: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II

3.00 Credits

Restricted to students in Canon Law.

LAT 502B: Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II

3.00 Credits

Restricted to students in Canon Law. Course is taught online only.

LAT 505: Readings in Canonical Latin

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the 1983 edition of the Code of Canon Law.

LAT 505A: Readings in Canonical Latin

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the 1983 Code of Canon Law, rotal decisions, and apostolic constitutions. Restricted to students in Canon Law.

LAT 505B: Readings in Canonical Latin

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 507: Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the forms, grammar, and vocabulary of Ecclesiastical Latin. No prior knowledge of Latin required. (This course is not part of the Elementary/Intermediate Latin sequence and does not count toward the School of Arts and Sciences language requirement. Students planning to continue the study of Latin beyond the first year should take LAT 101, LAT 501, or LAT 509 instead.)

LAT 508: Readings in Ecclesiastical Latin

3.00 Credits

Completion of the forms, grammar, and vocabulary of Ecclesiastical Latin followed by readings in Ecclesiastical Latin. Pre-requisite: LAT 407/507 or TRS 500A. (This course is not part of the Elementary/Intermediate Latin sequence and does not count toward the School of Arts and Sciences language requirement. Students planning to continue the study of Latin beyond the first year should be enrolled in LAT 102, LAT 502, or LAT 509.)

LAT 509: Intensive Elementary Latin

6.00 Credits

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Latin language of the classical period, and experience in reading continuous Latin texts of limited complexity.

LAT 509R: Intensive Elementary Latin (Rome Campus)

6.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 510: Readings in Postclassical Latin

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 509. Provides experience reading a variety of texts of postclassical Latin as the interests and needs of the students require.

LAT 512: Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

3.00 Credits

Advanced grammar and syntax, with extensive practice in the composition of classical Latin prose.

LAT 514: Livy

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 515: Roman Historiography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from such Latin historians as Sallust, Caesar, Livy, Suetonius, and Tacitus.

LAT 516: Intensive Intermediate Latin I

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 509. Provides experience in reading classical Latin prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Equivalent to LAT 103. Summer session only.

LAT 517: Intensive Intermediate Latin II

3.00 Credits

A sequel to LAT 516. Provides further experience in reading classical Latin prose and/or poetry at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: LAT 516 or the departmental placement exam in Latin. Equivalent to LAT 104. Summer session only.

LAT 519: Intensive Intermediate Latin

6.00 Credits

An accelerated study of selected classical texts designed to develop further the student's proficiency in reading Latin. The course builds upon the vocabulary and principles of grammar and syntax acquired in Elementary Latin (LAT 101-102, LAT 509).

LAT 520: Roman Drama

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected works of the Roman playwrights (Plautus, Terence, and/or Seneca), with attention to historical context, composition and language, and theatrical performance.

LAT 524: Julius Caesar

3.00 Credits

Studies the career and writings of C. Julius Caesar in the context of late republican politics and culture.

LAT 526: The Epigrams of Martial

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 527: Down on the Farm: Cicero, Horace, and the Good Life in Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 528: Roman Lyric

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected poems of Catullus and/or Horace.

LAT 529: Roman Elegy

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the poems of such Latin elegists as Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid.

LAT 530: Ovid

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of Ovid's poetry.

LAT 531: Horace

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of the poetry of Horace.

LAT 532: Virgil's Aeneid

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 533: Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of these works, with attention to language, tropes, meter, and historical, literary, and social context.

LAT 534: Latin Paleography I

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 535: Latin Epic

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of representative works, e.g., the Aeneid of Virgil or the Thebaid of Statius, with attention to language, tropes, meter, and historical, literary, and social context.

LAT 541: Introduction to Medieval Latin Language and Literature I

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (c. A.D. 200-1500), with an emphasis on the close reading of selected texts. Designed primarily to equip students to read patristic and medieval Latin texts with an appreciation of their characteristic vocabulary, syntax, style, and pronunciation, and secondarily to introduce them to the principal areas of medieval Latin scholarship, including bibliographies, great collections and repertories of sources, and lexica and other reference aids for the study of Latin works composed in the Middle Ages. Generally the first semester (not necessarily a prerequisite for the second) is devoted to the study of Latin works written before A.D. 800.

LAT 542: Introduction to Medieval Latin Language and Literature II

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (c. A.D. 200-1500), with an emphasis on the close reading of selected texts. Designed primarily to equip students to read patristic and medieval Latin texts with an appreciation of their characteristic vocabulary, syntax, style, and pronunciation, and secondarily to introduce them to the principal areas of medieval Latin scholarship, including bibliographies, great collections and repertories of sources, and lexica and other reference aids for the study of Latin works composed in the Middle Ages. Generally the second semester is devoted to the study of Latin works written after A.D. 800.

LAT 548: Roman Pastoral

3.00 Credits

Explores the ways in which Latin poets adapted a traditionally escapist genre to serve as a vehicle for reflection on contemporary social and political problems. Students read representative bucolics based ultimately on the Theocritean model, with attention also to issues of Roman political and social history (e.g., the collapse of the republican oligarchy, the changing conception of the ideal prince, and the Christianization of the aristocracy).

LAT 553: Roman Oratory

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected speeches of Cicero.

LAT 558: Roman Satire

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of representative works, with attention to one or more authors (Horace, Juvenal, Seneca, Persius) or to the development of this uniquely Roman literary genre from the polymetric satires of Lucilius (second century B.C.) to the prose diatribes of Jerome.

LAT 559: Lucretius

3.00 Credits

The principal focus of this course is a close reading of the Latin of Lucretius' powerful and perennially controversial poem. While consistent attention will be paid to the poetic craft and nascent Alexandrianism of the De rerum natura, the poet's adaptation and transformation of Epicureanism will be kept in mind as well through regular reference both to the surviving fragments of Epicurus himself and what we know of the activities of his "garden"/school. Thus, Epicurean theories of perception, cosmology, even theology -- distant, blissfully disinterested gods residing in the spaces between universes -- as well as the considerable Nachleben of this keen, philosophical rival of Christianity in the Roman Empire and beyond, into the modern era, will be considered and discussed.

LAT 561: Introduction to Medieval Latin Studies

3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to the Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (ca. A.D. 200-1500). Designed to improve students' facility in dealing with Medieval Latin texts of all kinds and to move them toward independent work with such texts. LATIN 561 will (1) introduce participants to those aspects of Latin identified as the constitutive elements of the Latin of the Middle Ages (i.e., the Classical, popular, vernacular, and Christian elements); (2) emphasize the close reading and careful translation of a selection of representative texts and documents, with attention to vocabulary and word formation, orthography and pronunciation, morphology and syntax, and prose styles and metrics; (3) provide an orientation in some of the principal areas of Medieval Latin scholarship, including lexica, bibliographies, great collections and repertories of sources, and reference works for the study of Latin works composed in the Middle Ages. Prerequisite: completion of four semesters of college Latin through LAT 104 or LAT 519 or the equivalent.

LAT 562: Topics in Medieval Latin Studies

3.00 Credits

Building upon the experience acquired in LATIN 561, this course will explore one or more Medieval Latin texts or genres, consider aspects of the development of medieval Latinity, or examine the Latin used in various fields of academic specialization. Prerequisite: LAT 541 or LAT 542 or LAT 561.

LAT 576: Roman Philosophical Works

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selections from the philosophical works of such authors as Lucretius, Cicero, and Seneca.

LAT 577: Early Christian Biography

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 579: Roman Epistolography

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of selected letters of such authors as Cicero, Horace, Pliny the Younger, Fronto, Symmachus, Ausonius, Jerome, and Augustine.

LAT 581: The Roman Novel

3.00 Credits

Considers a single work (e.g., Petronius' Satyricon, Apuleius' Golden Ass) or the development of fictional narrative in Latin prose and poetry.

LAT 585: Augustine's Confessions

3.00 Credits

A close reading of the text with full attention to its cultural, historical, and religious contexts.

LAT 587: The Roman Revolution

3.00 Credits

A survey of the events leading up to the fall of the Roman republic and an analysis of the "constitutional" revolution that followed. Students read a variety of sources in Latin and examine archaeological, numismatic, and art historical evidence.

LAT 588: The Age of Nero

3.00 Credits

Frequently portrayed as an age of luxury, decadence, and excess, Nero's reign from A.D. 54-68 can be vividly recreated by a close reading of Petronius, Suetonius, Tacitus, and other writers, as well as by the study of inscriptions, coins, and artwork. Focuses on the social history of Rome in the first century A.D.

LAT 589: The Christian Church in the Roman Empire

3.00 Credits

Examines the history of Christianity in the Roman empire from its origins in Roman Palestine in the first century to its establishment as the Roman state religion in the fourth century. Readings include selections from the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, Tacitus, Suetonius, Pliny the Younger, and Augustine. Topics include the persecution of Christians, their social status, the organization of the church, Christian conversion, and the conversion of Constantine.

LAT 592: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 592R: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 607: Early Latin Hymnody

3.00 Credits

Studies hymns that entered the liturgy of the Western Churches in the fourth and fifth centuries. Special attention to the historical and theological contexts of Latin hymnody and to the artistic qualities of hymnic prose and verse. Authors studied include Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose, Augustine, Niceta of Remesiana, and Prudentius.

LAT 609: Gregory of Tours

3.00 Credits

Examines the Histories of Gregory of Tours within the context of his life, times, and other writings. Pays special attention to the Christian architecture of the work and to Gregory's language and narrative style

LAT 641: Medieval Latin Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of one or more texts from the sixth century to the end of the Middle Ages, with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

LAT 642: Medieval Latin Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading and study of one or more texts from the sixth century to the end of the Middle Ages, with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

LAT 655: Survey of Roman Literature

3.00 Credits

Studies, in their chronological and cultural contexts, selected works of poetry and prose from the mid-third century B.C. through the reign of Hadrian.

LAT 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

LAT 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

LAT 705: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of one or more texts with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

LAT 706: Patristic Seminar

3.00 Credits

Close reading of one or more texts with attention to philological, literary, and historical dimensions.

LAT 733: Latin Paleography I

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the study of Latin scripts, both literary and documentary, from antiquity to the early Renaissance, with practical exercises in reading, dating, and localizing the various scripts.

LAT 734: Latin Paleography II

3.00 Credits

Study and transcription of selected Latin scripts, building on the expertise acquired in LAT 733. Includes an introduction to codicology (using manuscripts in the university's collections) and to textual criticism.

LAT 751: Diplomatics

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the study of medieval charters, acts, and other documentary records, with special attention to papal diplomata and the editing of documents in the university's collections.

LAT 792: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

LAT 803: History of the Latin Language

3.00 Credits

A survey of the development of the Latin language from the earliest texts to the end of the sixth century A.D. and the closing of the last publicly supported Roman schools. Studies both literary and nonliterary specimen texts with special attention to sources for the popular language.

LAT 833: Codicology

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the scientific examination of the make-up, parentage, provenance, etc., of medieval manuscript codices, with practice in describing manuscripts in the university's collections.

LAT 834: Textual Criticism

3.00 Credits

The theory and practice of editing a medieval Latin text.

LAT 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

LAT 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

LAT 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.