The Catholic University of America

Undergraduate Core Courses

The courses described below are only those 'core' courses that are explicitly required of departmental majors or minors. A wide variety of other courses are offered each semester both in the ancient languages and in classical civilization, and our students may choose from those as well according to the guidelines of their respective programs. In particular, upper-level language course offerings change each semester and vary according to the interests of both faculty and students; click on the links in the sidebar for lists of recent and upcoming classes.

Some recent versions of these courses have websites that you can visit. Click here to see a list of departmental course websites.

In all listings below, please note that the abbreviation "cr" refers to university "credit hours," and that CLAS courses require no knowledge or study of Latin or Greek.

CLAS 205: History of the Ancient Mediterranean I (3 cr)
Surveys the ancient Mediterranean world from the eighth through first centuries BC. Discusses the history of Greece, Rome, Carthage, and neighboring regions, including Persia, Israel, Egypt, and the Celtic lands. Analyzes the spread of Greek culture and the growth of the Roman Empire in a Mediterranean context. Focuses on economic, social, and political themes. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on critical interpretation.

CLAS 206: History of the Ancient Mediterranean II (3 cr)
Surveys the ancient Mediterranean world from the first through eighth centuries AD. Concentrates on the Roman Empire and its breakup into successor states after the fifth century. Includes discussion of neighboring regions north of the Danube and east of the Euphrates. Focuses on economic, social, and political themes. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on critical interpretation.

CLAS 211: Greek and Roman Mythology (3 cr)
The myths of the Greeks and Romans convey ideas about the divine and the human and the interaction of the two. Investigates creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and such major myth cycles as the Trojan War within their historical and ritual contexts and in terms of their literary and artistic formulations and expressions.

CLAS 312: Greek Literature in Translation (3 cr)
Close reading and study of important works of Greek poetry and prose (read in English) in their historical setting, with an examination of their influence on the Western literary tradition.

CLAS 313: Roman Literature in Translation (3 cr)
Close reading and study of important works of Roman poetry and prose (read in English) in their historical setting, with an examination of their influence on the Western literary tradition.

CLAS 317: Greek Art and Architecture (3 cr)
Surveys the art, architecture, and archaeology of Greece from its Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents through the late Hellenistic era. Readings and slide lectures/discussions emphasize the relationship of the arts to their broader cultural context and introduce a variety of art-historical methods. Major themes include the political and historical functions of art, self-definition and the Other, and the role of style in the construction of meaning.

CLAS 318: Roman Art and Architecture (3 cr)
Surveys the art and archaeology of the Roman Empire from its Etruscan origins until the age of Constantine. Examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts in Rome and its provinces in the context of political and cultural developments. Special emphasis on Roman identities--individual, gendered, social, civic, and cultural--and their effects on and reflections in art.

CLAS 425: Senior Tutorial (1 cr)
This one-credit course, taken independently with the senior project adviser in the first semester of the senior year, will familiarize students with the resources available for research in Classics, Latin, and Classical Civilization. Students will develop the topic and bibliography of the senior research project required for graduation.

CLAS 426: Senior Project (formerly known as "Senior Thesis") (2 cr)
A two-credit course taken independently with the senior project adviser in the second semester of senior year to complete the required research project.

GR 101: Elementary Greek I (3 cr)
First course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of Attic Greek; frequent exercises in reading and writing Greek.

GR 102: Elementary Greek II (3 cr)
Second course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of Attic Greek; frequent exercises in reading and writing Greek.

GR 103: Intermediate Greek I (3 cr)
Careful readings of Attic or Atticizing prose to build on the basics of syntax and grammar acquired in 101-102. In conjunction with the goal of increasing mechanical competency (recognition of forms, etc.), some attention to the ways in which prose persuades, informs, educates, and entertains through the careful choice and arrangement of words and thoughts.

GR 104: Intermediate Greek II (3 cr)
Careful readings of Homeric poetry to build on the basics of syntax and grammar acquired in 101-102. In conjunction with the goal of increasing mechanical competency (recognition of forms, etc.), some attention to the ways in which poetry persuades, informs, educates, and entertains through the careful choice and arrangement of words and thoughts.

GR 465: Senior Seminar (3 cr)
Reading and study of selected texts in Greek and English against the background of a rapid survey of the history of ancient Greek literature.

GR 511: Greek Prose Composition (3 cr)
An accelerated review of Greek grammar and syntax, and an introduction to the composition of Greek prose.
 

LAT 101: Elementary Latin I (3 cr)
First course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in forms, vocabulary, and syntax; frequent exercises in reading and writing Latin.

LAT 102: Elementary Latin II (3 cr)
Second course in a two-semester sequence giving intensive grounding in forms, vocabulary, and syntax; frequent exercises in reading and writing Latin.

LAT 103: Intermediate Latin I (3 cr)
A continuation of LAT 102 or LAT 509 that provides an introduction to Latin prose and poetry, with emphasis on the close reading, translation, study and discussion of representative texts and attention to their characteristic language, syntax, and style. The course also features continued review of the grammatical principles of Latin and expansion of vocabulary.

LAT 104: Intermediate Latin II (3 cr)
A continuation of LAT 103, with emphasis on the close reading, translation, study, and discussion of representative texts and attention to their characteristic language, syntax, and style. The course also features continued review of the grammatical principles of Latin and expansion of vocabulary.

LAT 465: Senior Seminar (3 cr)
Reading and study of selected texts in Latin and English against the background of a rapid survey of the history of Roman literature.

LAT 511: Latin Prose Composition (3 cr)
An accelerated review of Latin grammar and syntax, and an introduction to the composition of Latin prose.